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Wool

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The sheep

Wool is obtained from the fleece of sheep.

The quality and softness of wool varies accordingly to the sheep breed that it comes from - Merino, Lincoln, Dorset etc.

Science and technology have kept wool at the forefront of fabrics, adapting to modern needs without impairing its virtues.

Astronauts wear wool for comfort in the confines of their spacecraft.

Wool protects mountain climbers and polar scientists, the sailors who navigate single-handed the oceans of the world and men who seek oil in Alaska.

It is a fibre fit for heroes - and for more ordinary folk. It is as modern as moon flight, and as ancient as the hills.

The yarn

Wool is one of the oldest textile fibres used by humans, and was probably the first fabric ever to be woven into a textile
In fact the oldest surviving example of this textile anywhere is around 3,500 years old.

However, the oldest fine woollen fabric was found in an ancient Greek colony and is dated to the fifth century BC. 


The first woven wool garments date from 400BC to 300BC. 
In medieval times the wool trade became serious business, when the Medici and other great houses of Florence built their wealth on their wool-based textile industry. 


The natural qualities of wool are the reason it has been continually used for thousands of years. Wool remains a masterpiece of nature and provides the standard to which other fibres can be compared.

The warmth

The news has been full of "plastics in the sea" stories recently.

Massive contributors to this pollution are the fibres washed out of synthetic clothing by domestic washing machines.

As environmentally conscious consumers increasingly question their use of man-made fibres, there is a new demand for wool.

These are just some of the beneficial characteristics of woolen garments:

  • Effective all-weather protection

  • Renewable and environmentally friendly

  • Biodegradable

  • Efficient insulator

  • Very breathable

  • Tough and elastic

  • Easy to dye

  • Low allergy likelihood

  • Naturally flame-retardant, with a far higher ignition threshold than many other fibres, will not melt and stick to the skin causing burns

  • Better UV protection than most synthetic fibres